STA's Tour Sites

 

Learn Some More About St. Lucia's Exotic Tour Sites

 
Soufriere Taxi Tour Packages presently offer the following Tour Sites:
 

Diamond Falls & Tropical Gardens

In addition to its fabulous setting, Soufriere is the gateway to some of St. Lucia's most interesting natural attractions -- the world's only drive-in volcano; pretty Diamond Falls, the lowest of the six waterfalls that tumble down the mountain from the volcano. Nearby, too, are some historic plantations - Soufriere Estate and Morne Coubaril Estate and Fond Doux Estate which can be visited.
The privately-owned Diamond Falls and Mineral Baths, less than a mile east of Soufriere, are part of the Soufriere Estate dating from 1713. The Baths, originally built in 1784, were restored by Mrs. Joan Devaux in the 1980s, with some of the original 18th century baths still in use. At the entrance, a narrow path edged with tropical flowers and shaded by stately palms leads to the bathhouse and a series of pools, each a different temperature. Beyond are the falls roaring out of a mineral-streaked gorge and spilling through the gardens into the pools.

Source: http://www.nvo.com/pitonresort/

Diamond Falls STA Tours

Louis XVI built the baths so his soldiers could take advantage of the strong mineral content of these curative waters. They were almost destroyed in the Brigand revolt during the French Revolution. They were reopened in 1976.
As they're out in the open, swimsuits are required. Underground pipes feed the baths, which are of differing temperatures, heated by an underground stream from the sulphur pools (above). An attendant on duty can explain the procedure to you.
 Diamond Falls is also located here, as is a lush, well-landscaped garden.

Source: http://www.guidetocaribbeanvacations.com/

Diamond Falls is probably the main attraction of the Diamond Botannical Gardens & Waterfall property. What makes this waterfall stand out is that its waters are laced with minerals as its stream emanates from rainwater mixed with volcanism giving the falls a rather colorful appearance that seems to change a lot. The falls itself is probably around 10-15m tall and the walkways are well mantained and signposted meandering amongst a very large collection of plants and trees that are important to the island either agriculturally or from a biodiversification standpoint.

Source: http://www.world-of-waterfalls.com/

The privately-owned Diamond Falls and Mineral Baths, less than a mile east of Soufriere, are part of the Soufriere Estate dating from 1713. The Baths, originally built in 1784, were restored by Mrs. Joan Devaux in the 1980s, with some of the original 18th century baths still in use. At the entrance, a narrow path edged with tropical flowers and shaded by stately palms leads to the bathhouse and a series of pools, each a different temperature. Beyond are the falls roaring out of a mineral-streaked gorge and spilling through the gardens into the pools.

Source: http://bigcountryleo.blogspot.com/2009/04/diamond-falls-soufriere-st-lucia.html

Sulphur Springs

The water boils at 212° F but the superheated steam is hotter at 340°F. The black colour is caused by a chemical reaction between the sulphur and iron.
Colorful mineral deposits decorate the volcano. Yellow-green is sulphur. Dark green is copper. Purple is alkaline lead. White is calcium oxide. Brown is iron oxide. Dark grey is carbon.
Sulphur Springs Drive-In Volcano near Soufriere (French for Sulphur). The sulphur springs from which the town of Soufriere got its name, are a weak spot in the crust of an enormous collapsed crater, the result of volcanic upheaval 410,000 years ago.

Source: http://spas.about.com/library/weekly/aa081102d7.htm

The St Lucia volcano, also called the St Lucia sulphur springs is said to be the only drive-in volcano in the world. The last minor eruption occurred in the late1700’s. It was only a steam eruption but not one with magma and ash.
In the 1830’s approximately 760 tons of sulphur was mined and exported. Although there are signs of activity going on, for example the boiling mud, water and steam that emerge from the crater, the St Lucia volcano is dormant.
There are several pots of boiling water that are above the normal boiling point. There are also many colors at the surface as a result of sulfur, iron, calcium oxide, copper oxide, magnesium, carbon and other mineral deposited there.
The caldera is believed to be connected to the ocean because of increase reaction during a full moon which causes high tides.
The islands of the eastern Caribbean are linked via a volcanic arc, but the St Lucia volcano is different because the water has therapeutic qualities. You will find people who go to bath there in order to remove blemishes on their skin.
Walking in the crater is now prohibited after one of the guides fell in a pool of boiling water when he was jumping up and down on it. Fortunately, it was only waist height, so he was rescued but he did suffer from some severe burns from the waist down.

Source: http://www.st-lucia-vacation-guide.com/st-lucia-volcano.html

Billed as "the world's only drive-in volcano" (tell that to Big Island, Hawaii), you will smell these springs long before you glimpse them. The volcano, about eight miles in diameter, collapsed 40,000 years ago. Seven cones within the old crater still exist, as well as the two plugs that are the Pitons, but this is the only remaining active spring. From the viewing platform—to which you walk—you see a mass of ashy gray mud with rocks streaked black, yellow, and white. It bubbles and steams and stinks, and it's curiously affecting. Do not—we repeat—do not walk on the gray part. But do come at dusk to join the locals at the springs. Slather yourself in mud scooped out from the riverbed, then immerse yourself in the heat of the waters while surrounded by the glow of fireflies.

Source: http://www.concierge.com/travelguide/stlucia/

The sign near Soufriere advertising "the world's only drive-in volcano" marks the entrance to what is perhaps the most accessible sulfur fields anywhere in the Caribbean.
The presence of sulphur is often strong enough to discolor silver jewelry. The rotten egg/onion odor is memorable. A kiosk at the entrance (small admission fee) will pair you with a guide, whether you need/want one or not.
This was a volcano about 13km in diameter until 40,000 years ago when it collapsed in on itself. Theoretically it could erupt with hot ash and lava, not just gases.
Mineral deposits have left the earth colour with orange, green, yellow and purple streaks.
The bubbling mud pots bordered by steam vents jetting as high as 50 feet are impressive. At one time it was possible to walk among this field in the remnant of a volcanic crater, but after a few hikers stepped through the earth crust and were almost seriously hurt, everyone was confined to a boardwalk.
You can still get close enough to see everything clearly if you take binoculars and a telephoto lens. This is a hot, open place; far from what you would call beautiful, compared to the high surrounding vegetation, but nonetheless fascinating.

Source: http://www.guidetocaribbeanvacations.com/st_lucia/DriveInVolcano.htm

Toraille Falls & Gardens

Toraille Falls is one of the easier waterfalls to visit given that it's well signed with a pretty roomy car park. After getting through the entrance hut and paying the entrance fee, you can walk the short distance for a dip in the man-modified plunge pool or kill more time walking around the small botanical garden on the property. The falls itself might be around 7 or 8m tall (I reckon 10m might be generous).
To get here from Soufriere, take the Sir Arthur Lewis St (the same one that leads to the Diamond Botanical Garden turnoff as well as Fond St Jacques and the Edmund Forest Reserve) until you see the car park and signage for this attraction near the bridge.

Source: http://www.world-of-waterfalls.com/caribbean-toraille-falls.html

Cascading from an approximate height of 50 feet, the Toraille falls is indeed wonderful. It has in fact, been accepted as one of St Lucia’s nature heritage sites.
Many tourist go there on a daily basis. You can also find locals who escape and come to this water fall to clear their mind for the up coming week of work.
It is found in Soufriere, easily accessed from the main road, on your way to the Fond St Jacques rain forest.

Source: http://www.st-lucia-vacation-guide.com/waterfalls-of-st-lucia.html

Toraille Waterfall is your next stop where white torrents of water gush 50ft (15 meters) over a hillside, cascading gloriously into a pool at the centre of a beautiful garden. A nature trail leads through this natural tropical garden in a kaleidoscope of colour.

Source: http://www.gtahotels.com/activities/productdetails.php/SIC.2374MSHT.htm

The Toraille Waterfall is one of Saint Lucia’s many waterfalls and is located at Fond St. Jacques in the quarter of Soufriere. The property is owned by Casilda and Altus Hippolyte, who have transformed their one acre plot into an incredible experience for visitors and tourists alike. Apart from a cool bath in the pool beneath the imposing fifty foot waterfall, one is able to walk through well-tended nature trails, sit and soak in the sights and sounds of the country or hike to the upper trail to view the imposing Petit Piton in the distance.

Source: http://saint-lucia.strabon-caraibes.org/index.php
 

Fond Doux Estate/Plantation

Fond Doux Holiday Plantation in St Lucia is a 19th century colonial plantation hotel set in nature amidst the lush, tropical foliage of St Lucia’s breadbasket, historical centre and world heritage site, Soufriere.  Soufriere, home to St Lucia’s majestic Pitons, a world heritage site, forms the backdrop to this rustic, ecological plantation hotel which effortlessly marries old world colonial with every modern amenity in nature’s richest surroundings.  Imbued with a magical ambience, Fond Doux Plantation estate in St Lucia is ensconced in verdant tropical gardens, and surrounded by one of Soufriere’s most active agricultural plantations.  The French colonial estate house overlooks lush green gardens and original colonial cocoa racks and is minutes away from one of nature’s wonders, the Pitons world heritage site.  Luxurious, historical and architecturally intriguing the Fond Doux Holiday Plantation is a journey back in time and closer to nature.

Source: http://www.fonddouxestate.com/
 

New Jerusalem Mineral Bathe

Just a short bus ride from Soufrière Town towards Fond St. Jacques, New Jerusalem Warm Baths will be a welcomed retreat for sore muscles and a tired psyche. If you decide to walk from town to the entrance of New Jerusalem, it will be about a 30 minute walk. There is absolutely no level of difficulty to this hidden treasure, aside from a short ten-minute walk from the main road entryway back to the baths.
The baths are locally owned and managed. There are two warm baths that are equipped with seating areas and three different temperatures of water flowing from bamboo faucets from above. The pressure creates a nice warm body massage on achy muscles. This is not a crowded, nor a touristy location, so you will enjoy relative privacy and solitude.

Source: http://bigcountryleo.blogspot.com/2009/04/new-jerusalem-mineral-baths-soufriere.html

New Jerusalem is a collection of 3 hot baths located about 10 minutes into the rainforest. The water feeds into the pools through large bamboo poles that have been cleaned out. The children loved the soaking in the hot water and standing under the stream of hot water.

Source: http://www.stlucialearningproject.ca/

The next stop is the New Jerusalem Waterfall, where a brief walk along a trail through the forest will take you to this glorious waterfall. Marvel at this phenomenon, relax in the area or let the cool water caress your body. 

Source:  http://www.transworldnews.com/NewsStory.aspx?id=62921&cat=7

Next, we're off to New Jerusalem for a spa-like experience. Soak yourself in the crystal clear hot water and sweat out all of the toxins from everyday life. The water comes trickling through an underground track from the Sulphur Springs, filtering through different pools.

Source: http://www.shoretrips.com/common/search4.asp?tcode=037682
 

Piton Falls

There is no telling why this waterfall is called piton falls. The water from it does not come from the world famous pitons; however, it may be because it is on the way to one of the pitons (Petit piton).
But who knows, many things in Soufriere are associated with these pitons. You can get there when you’re on your way to St Lucia Hilton (Jalousie). The water is always warm and refreshing no matter what time of the day you go there.
The water comes from about 30 feet in the air and falls into a pool where people normally bath.

Source: http://www.st-lucia-vacation-guide.com/waterfalls-of-st-lucia.html

Very near the volcano, take a refreshing swim in a fantastic waterfall called Piton Falls. Hikers from the mountains stop here to rejuvenate after a long hike. During the 10 minute hike to the falls you can take in the lush natural habitat and beautiful tropical foliage. There are three bathing pools beneath the falls, the first one with a tepid temperature, the second, a mineral bath, with a very warm temperature, and the third a cooler option to the other two.

Source: http://www.ehow.com/how_4627313_spend-day-st-lucia.html

 

Morne Coubaril Estate

This working estate, growing cocoa, coconuts and manioc, is open to tourists who want to see traditional agriculture methods or ride horses around the 250 acre property.
Guides show how coconuts are opened, roasted and sent off to be made into margarine, soaps, oil and animal feed. Cocoa is fermented, dried on racks in the sun, oiled, polished by a man dancing on them, crushed and then formed into chocolate sticks. Manioc roots are grated, squeezed of excess water, dried over a fire and turned into farina and tapioca pudding also called kassava.
The grounds also house a re-creation of a farm workers village. Opening soon is Daniel's Ark, a farm tour for adults and children.

Source: http://www.planetware.com/soufriere/morne-coubaril-estate-stl-stl-mc.htm

This sprawling 250-acre estate was the first major estate established on the island, and dates from 1713. Treat yourself to the 90-minute tour. That interprets 18th century plantation life. You will walk along a track originally built for the mule-carts used on the estate. Beautiful tropical vegetation surrounds the workers village and renovated great house. Plan to stay for lunch – a lavish Creole buffet is available, by reservation.
Source:
http://www.10best.com/St._Lucia,Saint_Lucia/Attractions_&_Activities/Sightseeing/54991/Morne_Coubaril_Estate_Soufri|re/

On the site of an 18th-century estate, a 250-acre land grant by Louis XIV of France in 1713, the original plantation house has been renovated and a farm worker's village has been re-created to show visitors what life was like for both the owners (a single family that owned the landed until 1960) and those who did all the hard labor over the centuries producing cotton, coffee, sugarcane, and cocoa. Cocoa, coconuts, and manioc are still grown on the estate using traditional agricultural methods. Guides show how coconuts are opened and roasted for use as oil and animal feed and how cocoa is fermented, dried, crushed by a man dancing on the beans, and finally formed into chocolate sticks. Manioc roots are grated, squeezed of excess water, dried, and turned into farina and cassava used in baking. The grounds are lovely for walking or hiking, and the view of mountain and sea are spellbinding. The Pitt, a large, open-air restaurant, serves a creole buffet at lunchtime by reservation only.

Source: http://www.fodors.com/world/caribbean/st-lucia/review-451610.html

French plantations proliferated during the eighteenth century near Soufriere. Among them was the 250-acre still working cocoa, coconut and manioc plantation, Morne Coubaril Estate. Situated just south of Soufriere, the estate offers a peek at life in the eighteenth century. Although the living quarters and main buildings are closed to the public, short tours of the estate are available, which include a look at an operational sugar mill, a re-creation of a farm workers' village, and demonstrations of how the fruits of the plantation are treated and processed after harvesting. When you start to get a bit peckish, the Pitt Restaurant offers a plantation-style lunch of traditional Creole cooking.

Source: http://www.homeandabroad.com/c/134/Site/6062629_Morne_Coubaril_Estate_visit.html

 

Tet Paul

The Tet Paul Nature Trail is nestled on six acres of lush, verdant land in farming community of Chateau Belair. The trail is located in the Piton management Area, Saint Lucia World Heritage Site.
Hiking the trail is like soaring heavenward on a beautiful, natural staircase. The hike is rated easy to moderate. It is roughly 45 minutes long. Some of the most spectacular views on the island begins at the base of the trail.
The first stop is at the Kaye Kassav (Cassava Hut) wherethe Ameridian Traditional art of farine and cassava production can be learned.
The gentle ascent features nature at its best. Avariety of exotic fruit trees, (guava, soursop, avocado) likewise the medicinal plants and trees, and gusts of clean montain air accessorize the experience.
Further ahead, the trail initiates the unfurling of a magical experience. White frothy clouds set against a cerulean sky becomes more visible; an organic farm materializes and a lazy aquamarine sea beckons welcomingly below.
Tet Paul Nature Trail
Source: Tet Paul Brochure (www.soufrierefoundation.org/tetpaulnaturetrail)